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EY COL 



Wellesley College News 

Entered as second-class matter November 17, 1916. at the Post Office at Wellesley Branch, Boston. Mass., under th« act of March S, 1879. 



VOL. XXIX. 



WELLESLEY, MASS.,MARCH 23, 1921 



No. 22 



WELLESLEY CLUBS 
HAVE UNIQUE PLANS FOR DRIVE 



Fathers and Brothers Serve at Tea 
Room as Waiters 

The Columbus Wellesley Club has 
designed a most alluring Peter Rabbit 
made of scraps. It may be bought for 
$1.00 from the Club at 813 Bryden 
Road, Columbus, Ohio, or the pattern 
may be obtained at Headquarters, 27t> 
Lexington Ave., New York. Peter, 
with his pink ears and red vest makes 
a most charming Easter or all-the- 
year-around gift for any child. 

Philadelphia Wellesley women have 
been collecting subscriptions to the 
Philadelphia Ledger and putting them 
in the name of Mrs. Woods. Accord- 
ing to the terms of the contest, the 
woman getting the largest number of 
subscriptions will be awarded an auto- 
mobile and Wellesley enthusiasts hope 
and believe Mrs. Woods will be the 
winner, in which happy event the car 
will be raffled or auctioned for the 
Fund. 

Everybody is doing something for 
Wellesley. Perhaps Jane Furber, '92, 
holds the prize to date for her unusu- 
al job. Licensed Junk Dealer! Miss 
Furber conceived the idea of collecting 
old papers, magazines, etc., and start- 
ed in gaily only to be informed it was 
necessary for her to have a license. 
Did it worry Jane? We'll say it did- 
n't! She bought her license and is on 
her rounds. 

Marie Warren Potter, '07, is agent 
for a genuine Murille which she ex- 
pects to sell with advantage to the 
Fund. She hopes anyone knowing of 
collectors who might be interested will 
communicate with her in care of Head- 
quarters. 

Esther Pratt, 129 Gibbs St., Newton 
Center, is agent for Acorn Soap which 
she is selling for the Fund, 2 cakes 
for 25c, 9 for $1.00, 12 for $1.30. Es- 
ther's circular reads, "It floats and it 
lasts" which ought to induce every 
Wellesley gardener to buy at least a 
gross. 

It is interesting to note that Wel- 
lesley husbands, brothers, and fathers 
are doing more and more for the 
cause. Smocked Wellesley men have 
been waiting on tables and otherwise 
entertaining visitors at the Madison 
Tea Room. Billy Baker, Princeton, 
and r. nephew of Mrs. Sears, arranged 
for the printing of the Wellesley Post- 
ers through the firm of Barton and 
Durstine, also affiliated with Welles- 
ley. 

Headquarters is counting on Wel- 
lesley undergraduates to assist with 
publicity during the spring vacation. 
One representative from each town 





ELIZABETH WOODY EMILY GORDON 

Editor-in-chief of News President of Christian Association 

Both were affirmative speakers in Inte rcollegiate Debate. 



Three Years Defeat Wiped Out By Only 
Double Victory In League 



Wellesley debating emerged from its three years' shadow Saturday eve- 
ning, March IS, with a double victory over Barnard and Vassar. The judges 
gave their decision at Barnard unanimously and at Wellesley by a vote of 
two to one. The subject of the debate was "Be resolved: That the United 
States should further restrict European Immigration." The work of the 
teams showed at the same time mastery of the position they were defending 
and thorough knowledge of the weaknesses in their opponents' argument. 
Their readiness at incidental refutation was especially commendable. 

Wellesley's affirmative team did not defeat Vassar without great diffi- 
culty. The affirmative analysis was based on the two principles that Amer- 
ica should admit no more immigrants than could be assimilated, and no more 
than could be absorbed into her economic life. The segregation of these 
poverty stricken people in the industrial cities makes assimilation of any 
great numbers of them impossible. The cheapness of immigrant labor, re- 
sulting from ignorance and unemployment, and bringing with it a lowered 
standard of living, means that they are economically ndesirable. The last 
affirmuative speaker, Eleanor Burch, '21, proposed a plan modelled general- 
ly on the Welty bill now before the Senate, for the regulating the numbers 
of immigrants to be admitted. 

The negative met the affirmative squarely on the question of numbers, 
saying that the opposition of foreign governments, the effects of the war 
and the limited capacity of the steamships were all factors inevitably pro- 
hibiting any great influx of aliens. 

The negative could not agree with the affirmative as to the figures of the 
actual numbers of immigrants arriving. Denying the arrival of great 
hordes, they claimed that America has already sufficient agencies for educat- 

(Continued on page 2, col. 3) 



(Continued on page 5, col. 2) 



INTERCOLLEGIATE DEBATE 

Affirmative Negative 



Wellesley 

Barnard 

Vassar 

Radcliff 

Smith 

Mt Holyoke 



Vassar 
Wellesley 

Smith 
Earnard 
Mt. Holyoke 
Radcliff 



(Heavy type indicates winner) 



ZETA ALPHA PRESENTS 
" THE TWO VIRTUES " 



Guests are Charmed By Results of 

First Open Meeting Under 

New Dramatics Plan 



The presentation of Mr. Alfrea 
Sutro's amusing comedy "The Two 
Virtues" by the Zeta Alpha Society, 
on March 18, proved that excellence 
both in acting and in artistic effect is 
possible under the new dramatic sys- 
tem which allows but a short time for 
rehearsals with coaching by a society 
member. Through the entire four 
acts, the attention of the audience was 
fixedly held by the amsuing situa- 
tion of the play and the clever char- 
acter interpretation. The play clear- 
ly showed the careful coaching of Eu- 
genia Brown, '21, the vice-president 
of the Society. 

The role of Jeffery Panton, a middle 
aged, charmingly temperamental, and 
historically inclined Englishman, was 
taken by Frieda Halsted, '21, whose 
acting was quite above the average in 
masculine gestures and mannerisms. 
By her characterization it was clear 
that Jeffery Panton enjoyed being an 
irritating brother and a jilted lovei, 
who found he could worship the mem- 
ory of Isabel Gervoise without incon- 
veniencing his work in history. Used 
only to reminiscences, he was more 
than annoyed when Isabel called to 
beg him to save her husband, a would 
be genius, from the fascinating, 
strange, Mrs. Gilford. On his unwill- 
ing errand he found a kindred spirit 
in this unknown woman who also 
loved history and was willing to help 
with his book. 

It was when he was interrupted in 
the writing of this book that he em- 
phatically pointed out to his sister, 
Lady Milligan, one of the most noble 
of the nobility and impressive of sis- 
ters, that although chastity is a de- 
sirable virtue in woman, charity is 
equally paramount, though less prev- 
alent. In the scenes between brother 
and sister the conversation was ludi- 
crously frank. The part of Lady Mill- 
igan, to whom birth, rank, and money 
were the essentials of life, was admir- 
ably taken by Lucile Barrett, '22, who 
was a typical social leader, handsome, 
condescending and slightly officious. 

Mrs. Gervoise (Isabel), who cher- 
ished the thought of retaining the love 
of Jeffery Panton, was aptly called 
"silly" by Lady Milligan. The stupidity 
and insipid sweetness of her character 
was excellently portrayed by Ruth 
Melcher, '22. 

The unknown woman, Mrs. Gilford, 
who had patiently listened to the 
smug, self-satisfied Claude Gervoise's 



(Continued on page 4, col. 2) 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



WtUt&lty College J^eto* 



EDITOR IN CHIEF 
LLIZABETH M. WOODY, 1922 
Associate Editors 
BEATRICE JEFFERSON, 1922 
DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS, 1922 

Assistant Editors 
DOROTHEA COMLY, 1922 
MARGARET WATERSON, 1922 
ELIZABETH ALLEN, 1923 
MARGARET HOOGS, 1923 
ELIZABETH SANFORD, 1923 
HELEN STAHL. 1923 
DANE VERMILION, 1923 



LOUISE CHILD, 1924 

BARBARA CONGER, 1924 

RUTH HELLER, 1924 

BUSINESS STABV 
Advertising Manager 

SUSAN GRAFFAM, 1922 

Circulation Manager 

BARBARA BATES, 1922 

Assistant Business Managers 

LUCY JOHNSON, 1923 

RUTH WHITE, 1923 

MAY FALES, 1924 

ANNETTE WRIGHT, 1924 



, , „ • *v, „„iw» vear by a board of students of Wellesley College. 
Published ^V"^/^; « annum in advance. Single copies six 
Subscriptions one dollar and seventy five cents p ^ g ^ ^ 

cents each. All con tr.but.on. shouW b em ^ N ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ 

MLf L^Dtiht 6 w'elSey £«£ We/esley. Mass. All business communication, and 
Miss Laura Uw * nt - Wellesley College News, Wellesley, Mass. 

"^Tal ^ t£ aTs l£. Octobe7l0. 1919, at the Post Office at Wellesley Branch 
Entered as secon Acceptance for mailing at special rat. of 

SS p^^t.^ U<£ Act of October 3, 19X7. au^edOctober^^ 



MAUGUS PRESS, PRINTERS, WELLESLEY, MASS. 



The lamented demise of the old 
News board is always the occasion for 
a great deal of facetious crepe hang- 
ing. Perhaps this is well, for ofteu 
leal esteem degenerates into senti- 
mentality when one attempts to put 
it into words. However, the new 
Board wants to pause a moment be- 
fore it plunges into the labyrinth of 
"headlines, dummies, and galley sheets, 
to say that the News appreciates the 
sane and untiring effort which the 
News members of the Class of 1921 
have exerted in its behalf. 

A sense of proportion, an eye for 
the ridiculous, a discriminating appre- 
ciation, compounded with a redeeming 
degree of human fallibility, resulted 
in '21's ' contribution— a vision of a 
News assuming its proper place in the 
college community. '21 has helped the 
Board to glimpse this vision, and the 
new Board can hope for nothing bet- 
ter than to build well upon this foun- 
dation. 



CONCERT AND DANCE 

IN NEW YORK 
ON APRIL FOOL'S DAY 



Entertainment at Waldorf Astoria 
Another Venture for the Drive 



"AINT IT A GRAND AND 
GLORIOUS FEELING?" 



For the first time in four years Wel- 
lesley has won a debate, in fact two 
debates. To Eleanor Burch and Ada 
Haeseler, belongs the credit for this 
success. It was through their careful 
organization and management that the 
winning of the debate was possible. 

The continued interest and work of 
Eleanor Burch in debating througn 
two years of defeat deserved this 
year's success of the affirmative team 
of which she was chairman. As pres- 
ident of the Debating Club, she so in- 
creased the number of active members 
that there was ample material from 
which to choose this year's teams. 

The analysis of the question used by 
Wellesley' victorious negative team 
was largely due to Ada Haeseler. It 
was because of her coaching and su- 
pervision that the negative speakers 
at Barnard, all inexperienced in inter- 
collegiate debating, did such singular- 
ly splendid work. 

Too much cannot be said in appreci- 
ation of the officers of the Debating 
Club, the teams, the alternates, in fact 
everyone who has contributed in help- 
ing Wellesley win the debates. 



Every girl in college who boards 
the special on March 24, and spends 
vacation in or near New York is in- 
vited to the concert and dance at the 
Waldorf Astoria on April 1st, which 
has been arranged by the New York 
Wellesley Club. The University Glee 
Club, which is composed of graduates 
from thirty-eight universities and col- 
leges, will give this extra concert as 
its hearty endorsement of the Drive. 
The music for the dance, which will 
follow the concert, will be furnished 
by fifteen pieces from a leading New 
York orchestra. 

From the number of girls who buy 
their tickets early, the six most at- 
tractive will be chosen as ushers and 
program girls. These tickets which 
cost $3.00 may be obtained from Eliz- 
abeth Parsons, '22, 80 Shafer, or after 
vacation begins, at 137 Hicks Street, 
Brooklyn. 

The patronesses include: 
Mrs. Charles Evans Hughes 
Mrs. James Lee Laidlow 
Mrs. Richard Billings 
Miss Candace Stimson 
Mrs. Chas. L. Tiffany 
Mrs. William Fellows Morgan 
Mrs. Samuel Lewisohn 
Mrs. Benj. Harrison 
Mrs. Emily Calloway Hunt, chair- 
man of the committee in charge, asks 
the greatest possible support and en- 
thusiasm from the undergraduates. 





DOROTHY 



WILLIAMS 

Associate 



BEATRICE JEFFERSON 

Editors of News 



ing the foreigners. Finally the increa sed production that results from a 
large supply of labor will make the United States very valuable to Eu- 
rope,. This is America's opportunity to win the world market. 

The rebuttal of both teams was p csitive and telling. There was very 
little useless material, very seldom an y points left unattacked. The nega- 
tive failed to question with sufficient force the plan advocated by their op- 
ponents. The affirmative did not ans wer clearly enough Vassar's claim 
that the column of immigration autom atica'ly regulated itself. Yet aside 
from this there was an excellent clash of minds. 

After the debate the judges criticised the different speeches, giving the 
reasons by which they cast their votes. Miss Mary B. Hume, an alumna of 
Mt. Holyoke College, commended especially the readiness and flexibility of 
all the speakers. Wellesley was sup srior, she felt, in having a more intel- 
ligible, more apparent, brief. Each speaker summed up the points already 
made, and presented the points she wa s going to make. Miss Hume did not 
feel that the increased production argument of the negative, promising as 
it did greater prosperity, really met the affirmative case about the lowered 
standard of living. Nor did she think that the list of Americanization agen- 
cies presented by the negative was any real proof that the immigrants are 
being Americanized. It is unfortun-ate that statistics are impossible to 
secure. Camilla Loyall, Smith, '21, criticised the negative as being too in- 
terested in future speculation. The argument by which • the negative 
claimed that immigration did not low ;r the standard of living', by compar- 
ing the immigrant standard with that of South Carolina, she felt to be use- 
less. Nor could she see that the number of immigrants could affect very 
seriously the amount of production to the nation. That is a matter of tar- 
riff and finance. Mr. Avery, of Wellesley Hills, was the judge who voted 
for Vassar. The point in Vassar's favor was that their team reached a higher 
ethical level than Wellesley's, in argu'ng for the need of the world. It is 
true that the negative stopped short of the vital argument. The third 
speaker did not make clear enough America's moral obligation to the Euro- 
pean sufferers. The affirmative, however, should have met this ethical plank 
of their opponents, even though the lattei* did not stand very firmly upon 
it. A comment made by one critic was that Wellesley at last had learned to 
debate without overburdening the speeches with fact. Vassar, on the other 
hand, was complimented for her use of human,, simple illustration. 

The discussion was interrupted by a prolonged shout, heard all over the 
campus which greeted the news of Wel'esley's victory at Barnard. The Wel- 
les-ey team was the only negative to defeat its opponents. The success of 
both teams should be largely credited to the work of Eleanor Burch, '21, 
President of the Debating Club, and Ada Haeseler, 21, chairman of debate. 
The teams, their alternates and the miterial committee also deserve the 



TRUANT PROFESSORS 



Miss Scudder sailed March 2 from 
New York for Naples. She expects to 
pass the spring in Italy, and the sum- 
mer in Switzerland or Engand, re- 
turning in September to resume full 
College work. 

Miss Batchelder sailed March 8 and 
will give much of her time abroad to 
London. K. L. B. 



MARRIED 

'13 Helen Joy to Murray Rushmore, 
March 12, at Plainfield, N. J. 

'18 Jeannette Beard Nostrand to 
William Conant Brewer, Jr., March 
11, at Jamaica, N. Y. 



The teams were as follows: 
Vassar College 

Speakers 
Negatives 
Clara Cheney '21 
Margaret Ray '22 
Marion C. Cahill '21 

Alternates 
Amy Davison 
Mary Magennis 
Hildegarde Ross 
Juages 
Herbert S. Avery 
Lawyer. Wellesley Hills 

Mary B. Hume 
Alumna, Holyoke College 
Camilla Loyall 
Smith College, 1921 
Miss Pendleton was the presiding officer of the debate. 



highest praise. 
Weliesley College 

Speakers 
Affirmative 
Elizabeth Woody '22 
Emily Gordon '22 
Eleanor Burch '21 

Alternates 
Helen Robertson '21 
Ruth Hillyar '22 
Irma Bell '23 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



Blouses, Suits, 

Coats, Gowns 

Skirts, Coats, 

Sweaters, 
Silk Petticoats 

and Furs. 

Meyer Jonasson & Co. 

l^emozit and Boylston Sts. 




DANTE, THE MAN AND 
HIS MESSAGE 





MILDRED DURANT 
President of Athletic Association 

YOU HAVE WRITTEN POEMS! 

Do you care to have them revised or 
constructively criticised by successful 
authors ? If you do, then send us your 
manuscript (stories, articles or po- 
ems). We will criticise, and place 
them should they prove to be accept- 
able for publication. 

There is no actual charge for our 
services. If, however, you have not 
previously enrolled with the advisory 
department of this association, we re- 
quest that you enclose the initial fee 
of two dollars, which we must ask of 
each new contributor There is no 
additional expense, no future obliga- 
tion. 

It must be realized that we can only 
be of aid to those of serious intent. If 
you do mean to strive for literary suc- 
cess, we can help you in many ways. 
Our services are yours until we have 
actually succeeded in marketing at 
least one of your manuscripts. Send 
something today! 

Please enclose return postage with 
your communications. 

NATIONAL LITERARY 

ASSOCIATION 

131 W. 39th St. 

New York City 

Advisory Department 



FRANCES BAKER 
President of Barnswallows 

BORN 

ex '15 to Pauline (Carmichael) Cal- 
der, a daughter, Elisabeth, March 1, 
at Utica, N. Y. 

'19 To Helen (Moore) Ellis, a son, 
Arthur Phillip, February 28. 

ATTENTION! 
ALL PITTSBURGHERS! 



'He is the Greatest Christian Poet,' 
Says Prof. Dinsmore of Yale 



Since 1921 is the six hundredth an- 
niversary of the death of Dante, it 
seemed very fitting that Prof. Charles 
A. Dinsmore of Yale University, a 
noted Dante scholar, should speak to 
the college on March 18th. His sub- 
ject was "Dante: The Man and his 

Message." 

Every generation must rewrite its 
history; works of science are in vogue 
for only ten to fifteen years, before 
they must be revised; but poets en- 
dure forever. Only when truth is 
wedded to beauty is there immortality. 
Not only has the name of Dante lived 

The great singers of the ages are 
Homer, the poet of action, Shakes- 
peare, the poet of passion, and Dante, 
the poet of the precision and majesty 
of moral law. Homer was of the an- 
c : ent world; Shakespeare of our mod- 
ern complex civilization; while Dante 
was the inspired voice and interpreter 
of the ten chaotic centuries that fill the 
gap between the ancient world and 
Shakespeare. Not only was this great 
Italian the interpreter of the Middle 
Ages, but, according to Prof. Dins- 
more, he was also the first modern 
man. He sang of love and sin — the 
force of modern fiction and poetry. 
His was the first introspective mind — 
for he found his theme., the struggle 
of humanity, in his own soul. 

The common impression of Dante io 
that he was a vindictive man, a vol- 
cano flaming with indignation. This 
idea probably comes from his death 
mask which, however, exaggerates his 
facial characteristics. It is true that 
Dante was a "good hater:" he be- 
lieved that it was 1 his duty to hate sin 
just as it was his duty to love virtue. 
But he was lead by his admirations 
and his love, instead of by his vindic- 
tiveness. He had a sensitive nature; 
the world hurt him. 



The story of the iove of Dante for 
Beatrice is the noblest love story in 
the world. At the age of nine, he first 
saw her and was filled with a love 
that never died. Love smote his gen- 
ius into power. It was an ethereal 
and holy love,, akin to the passion of 
a saint for a virgin. It was the love 
of a great poet for a spiritual ideal. 
Dante's supreme purpose was to say 
of her what had never been said of 
any woman and to rear an immortal 
monument to her. His solution of the 
problem of life was the idea that love 
is in all things. Primarily Dante was 
the great lover of beauty and of divine 
truth. In Prof. Dinsmore's opinion, 
he is the greatest of all Christian 
poets. 

Like the Hebrew prophet, Dante 
felt called upon by God to give a def- 
inite message to mankind. He wrote 
not in Latin but in Italian, the tongue 
of the common people, so that his 
message should reach all. This mes- 
sage was that we should accept God's 
will — His will is our peace. Faith is 
not credulity but the look of the soul 
into truth. All our experiences are 
bound in love and find their signifi- 
cance in eternal love. "Our human- 
ity is in God and God is in our human- 
ity — This is the ultimate beatitude, 
beyond which there is no joy in this 
world or in the world to come." 



COLLEGE NOTES 



Miss Emily Tyler Holmes and her 
"fiasco" extensively entertained the 
college at an al fresco reception on 
Thursday, March seventeenth. 

During the past week the following 
resignations from societies have been 
accepted: Eleanor Burch, Helen Rob- 
ertson from Agora; Marcia Cressey, 
Janet Victorius from Alpha Kappa 
Chi ; Dorothy Avery from Zeta Alpha. 
In general, dissatisfaction with the 
present society system has been the 
cause of the resignations. 

Muriel Fritz, '20, spent the week- 
end in Stone. 



Wellesley Benefit Tea Dance. 

William Penn. March 28 

$3 per couple 4-7 o'clock 

ANDREW J. LLOYD CO. 

The Andrew J. Lloyd Company store 
at 75 Summer Street, Boston, is very 
conveniently located for Wellesley Col- 
lege students. At this store you will 
find all sorts of eyeglasses and spec- 
tacles, especially the student's shell 
spectacles, kodaks, films, developing 
and printing, student's fountain pens, 
pencils especially the kind with the 
ring to be worn with a cord or ribbon, 
Bird Glasses, in fact, everything in 
the optical line. Other stores at 315 
Washington Street, 165 Tremont 
Street, 310 Boylston Street. Adv. 



HATS 



Our new Spring hats, in all the 
straws and silks in fashion this sea- 
son, are ready for you, in your choice 
of style and color, at low cost. 

Come in the next time you are in 
town. 



BOSTON 

Sixty-five — Sixty-nine Summer Street 



4 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



i 





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ZETA ALPHA PLAY 
(Continued from page 1, col. 4) 



Janet Ward '22 
Lucile Barrett '22 



Gray Suede 
Brown Suede 
Black Satin 
Tan Russia Calf 
White Kid 

Baby Louis Heels 

In our new second floor department 
for Girls 

E. W. Burt & Co. 

32 West Street 



poems., was a surprise to the audience. 
Her charm and simplicity stood out in 
contrast with the blackness of her 
character as painted by Isabel. Phebe 
Gross, '21, as Frieda Gilford, was al- 
together lovely. Her voice was solo 
and rich and every action was natural 
and effective The audience was in 
hearty sympathy with Jeffery's re- 
newed interest in history after the 
coming of his new secretary. 

Although the parts played by Janet 
Ward, '22, and Dorothy Breingan, '22, 
were less important they stood out as 
the distinctive characters of Claude 
Gervoise and Alice Exerne. 

The setting of the first and third 
acts was in Jeffery Panton's rooms in 
London. His living room was in clev- 
er contrast with the cretonned sitting- 
room of Mrs. Gilford in Act II and IV. 
Their masculine and feminine tastes 
proved different in every case except 
for the historical books. 

Although Zeta Alpha has produced 
more perfect plays, as in the case of 
"The Tragedy of Nan" when a pro- 
fessional coach assisted, still the suc- 
cess achieved in "The Two Virtues." 
under the new dramatic plan, speaks 
highly for the members who so dili- 
gently worked to produce it. 

The cast was as follows: 
Jeffery Panton Frieda Halsted '21 
Frieda Gilford Phebe Gross '21 

Isabel Gervoise Ruth Melcher '22 



Claude Gervoise 
Lady Milligan 
Mary, The Maid, 

Catherine Broadhurst '22 
Bayliss, The Butler Tacy Perry '22 



Bennett, Mrs. Hunt, Miss Damazy, 
Miss Orvis, Mrs. Irish, entertained the 
Faculty and Administration officers of 
the college at a reception in the Stone 
Hall drawing-room on Friday after- 
noon. March eighteenth. 



COSMOPOLITAN CLUB 
RECENTLY ORGANIZED 

Under the enthusiastic sponsorship 
of Miss Hart, the "Vfellesley Cosmo- 
politan Club, is fast becoming a live 
college organization. Although the 
club has a definite constitution, its 
purpose may be well expressed by the 
following quotation from the constitu- 
tion of the Harvard Club, with which 
it is to occasionally join for social 
functions. "To unite for their mutual 
benefit, (college students) of all na- 
tionalities, and to stimulate a sympa- 
thetic appreciation of the character, 
problem, and intellectual currents of 
other nations." 

The Wellesley Cosmopolitan Club 
enjoyed a most delightful evening at 
the Zeta Alpha house on Monday, 
March 7. Various American games 
were played and the evening ended 
with a marshmallow roast around the 
the fireplace. Although it was de- 
cided to keep the Club an informal or- 
ganization, the need and convenience 
of officers was keenly felt. Josephine 
Rathbone, '21, was elected president 
and Carmen Arguinaldo, '24, secretary. 



COLLEGE NOTE 

The Faculty members living in 
Stone, Miss Bliss, Miss Case, Miss 



DIED 

'94 Mrs. Mary J. Peck, mother of 
Carolyn J. Peck, March 5, at Wellesley 
Hills, Mass. . 

'97 Mr. Harry P. Dowst, husband of 
Margaret (Starr) Dowst, March 13, in 
New York City. 

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a mondy back guarantee if not satisfied. 

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PYRAMID PRESS: PUBLISHERS 
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New York City 

Gentlemen : — Enclosed herewith is $5.00 for 
which kindly send me your shorthand course 
in ten easy lessons by mail. It is understood 
that at the end of five days, I am not satis- 
fied my money will be gladly refunded. 



Name 

Street 

City and State 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



5 




DR. EBEN MOORE FLAGG 

ORTHODONTIST 

558 Washington St., Wellesley 
Office Hours, 9 a. m. - 12 m. 2 - 5 p. m, 
Graduae of New York School of 

DENTISTRY 

Telephone, Wellesley 471-M. 



ECONOMY 

Let B. L. KARTT, the Local Tailor, do your 

TAILORING, CLEANING, PRESSING 

Workmanship and Satisfaction Always 

Guaranteed 

PRICES MODERATE 

B. L. KARTT 
Tailor and Furrier 

Wellesley Sq., Opp. Post Off. Tel. Wei. 217-R 



TAXI SERVICE 

Baggage Transfer 



Perkins Garage 

SUMNER FROST, Proprietor 



69 Central St., Wellesley, Maw. 

Telephone 
Wellesley 409 

CARS STORED. Let us store 

your car for you in our new 

modern Garage. Cars washed 
and polished. 




THE* PARLIAMENT* OF* FOOLS 



THE LIMIT 



(excerpt from Freshman periodical 
Entitled (The Trig) 



T'was secant and on Copeland Square 

Imaginary students passed. 
The clocks did all arithmetic 

To logarithm fast. 
"Beware the tan gent, O my girl, 

The graphed at poles, the formu- 
lae!" 
"But Y?" she X-ed. "I don't Z how 

To calculate the Y." 
He took his Constants hy the hand. 

"You complex problem!" he de- 
claimed. 
"You're always mean — why be ex- 
treme, 

Father?" she exclaimed. 
And as acutely thus they spoke. 

The dusky radical circled near. 
"To distant limits let us speed! 

He'll calculus, I fear!" 
But Constants woke determinant 

And soon evolved the unknown Y. 
The night before while doing Math. 

She'd had too much of II. 

R. H. '24 



for queries it is hoped she will buy 
one of the new prize posters at the 
Bookstore. (Price 50c), and place it in 
her window or in some other conspic- 
uous place. NOTE: DON'T FAIL TO 
PASTE WELLESLEY STICKERS 
ON ALL LUGGAGE! 



THE TALE OF THE EARLY BIRD 



I wont to the lecture at Billings 

I was required to go, 
The lecture was on something 

I really had to know. 
I went up very early, 

And sat in the front row; 
It was reserved for Faculty, 

So back I had to go. 
I stowed myself away at last 

In the middle of the hall; 
And then they moved to Chapel, 

There wasn't room for all. 
We rushed out from Billings 

Of our seats bereft, 
The late ones got there early, 

The early birds got-left. 

B. B 



'24 



WELLESLEY CLUBS 

HAVE UNIQUE PLANS 

FOR DRIVE 



BARN SELECTS "DRAKE' 
AS FIRST JUNE PLAY 



(Continued from page 1, col. 1) 



will be given a form story for submis- 
sion to local papers. Besides this eve- 
ry girl is expected to familiarize her- 
self with the campaign in order to be 
able to answer questions. As a teaser 



The Barn announces "Drake" as the 
first all-college June play to be given 
under the new Barn plan. 

Drake was written by Louis N. 
Parker, the author of "Disraeli" and 
"Pomander Walk." It has never been 
produced in America, but was given 
twice at Sir Herbert Tree's Theatre, 
in London, once in 1912, just before 
the war. 



Another Chance to Help Wellesley 

BUY YOUR LUNCH ON THE SPECIAL TO NEW YORK. 
SUFFICIENT SANDWICHES SUSTAIN SUCCESS. 
PENUCHI PULLS PROFITS. 
FUDGE FILLS THE FUND. 
CAKE CLEARS COPIOUS CASH. 

ENTIRE PROCEEDS 

to go to the 

SEMI-CENTENNIAL ENDOWMENT FUND 

If you liked it before, you'll like it doubly now. 
Agora will manage both making and selling. 




NAVY BLUE 

SAILOR MIDDY BLOUSES 

FOR GIRLS 

Finest Material — Tailored 
•^yii. Same as U. S. Nary 

All wool flannel or 

serge $5.00 

Neckerchiefs or Ties $2 

We make skirts to match 

/ri/J' / \ the blouses. Rating or 

'itirir UA Emblem 60c 

W/«*S^ Ajft whit0 Blonses 2 " 

dW ^3 /#U^ Blue Linen iliddy Suits 

$12 
Mail Orders Filled to 
All parts of the V. S. 

measurement blank. 

Money refunded 

if unsatisfactory. 

Send for 

ARLINGTON UNIFORM GO. 

Box 21 Arlington Heights, Mass. 



Dr. Cbs. A. DRAPER 

FOOT SPECIALIST 

ORTHOPEDIC CHIROPODIST 

ALL FOOT AILMENTS 
SCIENTIFICALLY TREATED 

Suite 414, Huntington Chambers 
Copley Sq., Boston 

Near Back Bay Station 
Phone B. B. 839. 

Look for the Blue Sign 

WELLESLEV TEA ROOM and FOOD SHOP 

ALICE G. COOMBS, '93 

GRACE I. COOMBS, '94 
Wellesley Square, Over Post Off. TeL 



H. L. FLAGG 

Company 

WATERMAN 

and MOORE'S 
FOUNTAIN 

PENS 

PHONOGRAPH RECORDS and 
NEEDLES, EATON, CRANE & 
PIKE CO'S FINE STATION- 
ERY, WRIGHT & DITSON'S 
ATHLETIC GOODS MAGA- 
ZINES, NEWSPAPERS, DE- 
VELOPING AND PRINTING 
FILMS, DYE STAMPING, 
CARD ENGRAVING, CHRIST- 
MAS CARDS 

WELLESLEY SQUARE 

PHONE 51330 



A NOVELTY! SILHOUETTES 

Send them as Easter cards. Watch our window for samples. 

SPECIAL SALE 
of Parchment shades with Wellesley Seal. They make appropriate gifts 
for teachers, graduates, and undergraduates. 

SUE RICE STUDIO 

10 Grove St. 



"Great oaks from little acorns grow" The dollars from these soap cakes flow 

for 

THE WELLESLEY SEMI- CENTENNIAL FUND 

ACORN SOAP 
Jave you a cake of Acorn soap in your room? 
It not only floats but it iasts. Wonderful for your complexion. 

Watch it lather in hard water. Don't go to the village for your soap. 

"ome to the Alumnae Office and get 



ACORN SOAP 



2 cakes 25c. 



9 cakes $1.00. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



CALENDAR 



March 24, Thursday — Spring recess 
begins. 

April 5, Tuesday — Spring recess 
ends. 



MASS MEETING BOOSTS FUND 
Miss Bates Presides 



"When anyone asks you if Welles- 
ley is a brand of soup, tell them it is 
superior," said Miss Bates who pre- 
sided over the Fund Mass Meeting in 
Houghton Memorial Chapel, Thurs- 
day afternoon, March 17. The seven- 
teenth was a memorable day on which 
to hold such a meeting for it was the 
fiftieth anniversary of the signing of 
the charter and also the date on which 
the fire occurred in 1914. 

The first speaker, Miss Margaret 
Eliot, 1914 college government presi- 
dent, told of the fire as seen by an 
eye witness. She drew an inspiring 
picture of the girls who, some of 
them barefoot, formed a fire line to 
help save what little could be reached, 
and of the philosophy professor who, 
while all her possessions were burn 
ing, said bravely "I have spent my life 
teaching that things which are seen 
are temporal, now we have the chance 
of our life to prove that the things 
unseen are eternal." Mrs. Eliot ex- 
pressed her belief that Wellesley 
training had helped Wellesley women 
to meet this crisis. 

The next speaker, Miss Elsie God- 
dard, Executive Chairman of the 
Fund, prepared the students to pass 
an examination on the Fund. Miss 
Goddard under whose feet grows "not 
grass but greenbacks" brought the 
report of 4,436 subscribers with a 
total of $767,439.77. "Easter Vaca 
tion is an opportunity to talk Welles- 
ley in 1000 different towns, and every 
girl is asked to do her very best to 
keep the progress of the drive only 
being sure to see the local chairman 
before asking for gifts." 

Mrs. Carl Dreyfus, Assistant Chair- 
man of Publicity, spoke next. "As I 
stood before the smoking ruins of 



College Hall which had been my home 
for almost three years, I could not be- 
lieve that Wellesley would survive the 
destructions of its home." The fact 
that it has survived is amply proved 
by the enthusiasm with which this 
drive is being carried on. Recurring to 
Miss Goddard's r>lea for the students 
to talk Wellesley, Mrs. Dreyfus said. 
"People are going to look to you for 
a critical estimate of what College is 
worth and why it deserves to be sup- 
ported. Learn more facts, get a more 
general idea of what the college is ac- 
complishing. Every girl can act as a 
personal publicity agent for the Fund. 
Mrs. Dreyfus also explained the pub- 
licity letter which "accompanied by a 
beautiful photograph if possible" is to 
be used as publicity nature for the 
various local newspapers. 

The next speaker was Alice Joy, '21, 
Chairman of the Undergraduate Pub- 
licity Committee, who urged that eve- 
ryone do her best to stand back of all 
that the committee does and to help 
by sending to the chairman all news 
of herself or friends. Following: this 
speech Miss Bates introduced the one 
"truly progressive" speaker of the af- 
ternoon, Mrs. Henry F. Burton. Mrs. 
Burton flattered the students with her 
compliments on undergraduate good 
looks and carriage, and on the person- 
al poise of the younger graduates. 
"The Wellesley atmosphere," she said, 
has an odor of its own, made up of 
oak buds for strength, pine needles for 
deathlessness and the earth smell 
symbolizing fertility." Mrs. Burtoi. 
closed her speech with a challenge to 
save 7 cents a day toward the $2,700,- 
000 to pay their debt for the carriage, 
the spirit and the poise which Welles- 
ley gives. 



ENGAGED 



'13 Ruth Blaisdell to Gordon Blake 
Sawyer of Boston, Mass. 

'13 Marion M. B. Allison to Dr. 
Benjamin I. Harrison of Cleveland, O. 

'19 Esther Hoover to Herbert 
Amery Brand of Chicago, 111. 





Distinctive 
Easter 
Footwear 

for 
College Girls 

Pierrot One-Strap Pumps 

in black and brown leather, brown satin, and suede and leath- 
er combinations. Turn soles and Louis heels $11.50 

Gray Suede Linked Two-Strap Pumps Turn soles and Louis heels $13 

Jordan Marsh Company 




FRANK BROTHERS 

Fifth Avenue Boot Shop 

Near Forty-Eighth Street, New York 

Boots, Slippers, Hosiery for Men, 

Women and Children 



BOSTON 



Tremont and Boylston Sts^ 
Little Building 



CHICAGO 

Michigan Blvd. Bide, 
corner Washington. St. 

ST. LOUIS 
Arcade Building 



NEW HAVEN 

Hotel Taft 

PITTSBURGH 

Jenkins Arcade 

CLEVELAND 

Athletic Club Building 



WASHINGTON 

Woodward Building 

opp. Shoreham Hotel i 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Whitney Building 

133 Geary Street 



I. C. S. A. FELLOWSHIPS 



The Intercollegiate Community Ser- 
vice Association is offering to tht 
graduates of Bryn Mawr, Smith ana 
Wellesley, three fellowships of the 
value of $450 each. The aim of a 
fellowship is to offer to those looking 
forward to professional service in so- 
cial work, opportunity for training 
both in its theory and practice. It pro- 
vides residence in the college Settle- 
ments of New York, Boston, or Phila- 
delphia from October first to July 
first. By contact with the industrial 
group, the students will gain in the 
sympathy and understanding which 
are essential to the finest social teach- 
ing and leadership. The fellowship 
also provides instructions in the prin 
ciples of social education and prac- 
tice work in whatever phase of social 
education or reconstruction the stu- 
dent may desire. 

The requirements for applicants are 
appropriate undergraduate courses, 
Economics, Sociology, Psychology, Bi- 
ology, etc., evidence of good scholar- 
ship and satisfactory references as to 
health, character and especial fitness 
for social work. 

Applications for these fellowships 
should be sent before May first to the 
Chairman of the Fellowship Commit- 
tee of the I. C. S. A., Miss Jane I. 
Newell, Wellesley. 




STUDENT SUPPLIES 

TYPEWRITING PAPER 

ENGRAVING AND PRINTING 

BLANK BOOKS AND LOOSE 

LEAF DEVICES 
(all sizes) 

A LINE A DAY BOOK 
LEATHER GOODS 
FOUNTAIN PENS 
FINE PAPER AND ENVEL- 
OPES 
57-61 FRANKLIN ST., BOST'N 



The Yarn Shop 



Sells the Finest Grades of 



Y 



am for Knitting 
1 2 Brook St. 

First street to the Right 
Beyond the Square 



5 LEY COL 



Wellesley College News 

Entered as second-class matter November 17, 1916, at the Part Office at Wellesley Branch, Boston, Mass., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



VOL. XXIX. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., APRIL 13, 1921. 



No. 23 



ALUMNAE BODY CONTRIBUTES 
OVER MILLION TO FUND 



Varied and Humorous Plans Adopted 
To Raise Money For Drive 



On March 31 st, sixty per cent of the 
Alumnae body (5,800 girls) had con- 
tribted $1,002,396! At the rate we 
are going with bazars, musicales, 
gifts and benefit sales we shall soon 
raise the $2,700,000 ourselves. 

The Glee Club Concert-Dance on 
April 1st at the Waldorf was a tre- 
mendous success as it not only cleared 
more than $2,000, but demonstrated 
that there are many very lovely Wel- 
lesley girls au naturel. 

Ideas for increasing the fund come 
in daily. 

Mrs. Wm. W. Pickard, (Alice Ross- 
ington, '07), 83 Whitford Ave., Nut- 
ley, N. J., will send postpaid upon re- 
ceipt of $1.00 one pound of creamy 
maple sugar made in the New Bruns- 
wick woods. 

Mrs. Louis Halle (Rita Sulzbacher, 
'07), is sponsoring another rummage 
sale in Jamaica the second week in 
April. 219 Abingdon Road, Kew Gar- 
den, L. I. will reach her, if one wishes 
to mail contributions, although local 
gifts will be called for. 

The Wellesley postcards which are 
miniatures of the lovely prize poster 
are on sale at 5c. each. Don't fail to 
buy a hundred. The posters them- 
selves sell for 50c. each, or $5.00 per 
dozen, or 100 for $25. 

One girl reports $10 per week sell- 
ing Wellesley gardens via telephone 
alone. If five thousand girls would 
sell five Peter rabbits or five Welles- 
ley gardens each day via telephone, 
our coffers would be exceedingly en- 
riched. 

Emily Sophie Brown, '94, who made 
so much money for us during the res- 
toration drive has agreed to read 
specimens of handwriting again. As 
Miss Brown is a member of the Con- 
necticut Legislature she cannot prom- 
ise to make a reading in less than two 
weeks time,, but what she has to say 
is worth the wait and the money. Her 
charge is 25c. for each specimen when 
sent in groups of ten or more, 50c. 
for a single reading, and $1 for a 
more extended reading of a single 
specimen. All who solicit specimens 
for Miss Brown, should see that each 
specimen be: 

1. Written with pen and ink ordin- 
arily used by writer. 

2. On unruled paper. 

3. Signed by the writer and sex 
stated if not shown by autograph. 

4. At least 50 words in length. 

5. Accompanied by proper fee and 
self-addressed, stamped envelope for 
return. 





EMM AVAIL LUCE 
President of Student Government 
Association 



MARION PERRIN 
President cf Debating Club 



All College Officers 1921-1922 



College Government 

Pres. — Emmavail Luce 1922 
Vice-Pies. — Margaret Byard 1922 
Sec— Elizabeth Head 1923 
Treas.— Irene Ott 1923 

Christian Association 

Pres.— Emily Gordon 1922 
Vice-Pres.— Pauline Coburn 1922 
Sec— Joy Scheidenhelm 1924 
Treas.— Elizabeth Abbott 1923 
Barnswallows Association 
Pres. — Frances Baker 1922 
Vice-Pres. — Nora Cleveland 1923 
Sec. — Amy Carpenter 1924 
Treas. — Virginia Jemison 1923 
Bus. Manag'r— Dorothea Smith 1923 

Debating Club 

Pres. — Marion Perrin 1922 
Vice-Pres. — Margaret Merrill 1922 
Sec— Elizabeth Sanford 1923 
Treas.— Irma Bell 1923 



Pres.- 



Athletic Association 

-Mildred Durant 1922 



COMPETITION FOR CHAIRMAN 
OF PUBLICITY OF THE 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



Vice-Pres.— Ida Webber 1923 
Sec — Frances Kinghorn 1924 
Treas. — Josephine Wallace 1923 
Custodian — Katherine Pomeroy 1924 

I. C. S. A. 
Pres.— Elizabeth Frost 1922 

Fire Chief 

Marion George 1922 
Chairmen of Barn Committee 

Costume — Isabel Dietrich iy22 
Lighting— Harriet Cavis 1923 
Properties — Alice Richardson 1923 
Scenery — Lorraine Combs 1923 
Chairmen of C. A. Committees 
Conference — Mary Louise Fritch- 

man 1922 
Discussion Group — Elizabeth Hand 

1922 
Membership — Alice Richards 1922 
General Aid— Mary Fraser 1923 
Community Service — Carol Rhodes 

1923 
Publicity — Jane Harvey 1923 
Social— Esther Rolfe 1923 

THE MASEFIELD PRIZE 
FOR POETRY 



(Continued on pafe 4, col. 1) 



All those who are particularly in- 
terested in Athletics are urged to try 
for this new position. 

The candidates are to be judged on 
the basis of write-ups of the Indoor 
Baseball and Basketball games and 
the Indoor Gym and Riding Meets. 
Seniors will not be considered as com- 
petitors. 

Write-ups tire to be handed in not 
later than five P. M. on the Tuesday 
nfter each event to Helen Sherman, 13 
Wilder, or Mildred Durant, 501 Caze- 
nove. 



On the occasion of his last visit to 
Wellesley College, Mr. John Masefield, 
the poet, established an annual prize 
for the best poem written by a mem- 
ber of the Senior Class. This prize is 
an autographed copy of a book of his 
own poems. Those students wishing 
to compete for the prize this year will 
kindly note the following: 

1. Poems must be handed to some 
member of the committee on or be- 
fore May 2. 

2. An author may present as many 
poems as she wishes and there is no 



NEW INTERCOLLEGIATE ORGAN- 
IZATION TO FOSTER STUDY 
OF MODERN PROBLEMS 



Muriel Morris Elected President of 
Liberal League 



(Continued on page 3, coj. 1) 



"The purpose of our new organiza- 
tion", says Muriel Morris, president 
of the Intercollegiate Liberal League, 
"is to promote interest in modern 
questions, to develop an informed stu- 
dent opinion on social, industrial., po- 
litical and international problems." 
Such is the scope of the organization 
formed by representatives of forty- 
five colleges at the Convention of Lib- 
eral College Students held in Cam- 
bridge, April 2nd and 3rd. 

The primary aim of the League is 
to bring college students in touch 
with the practical thought and the 
vital problems of national and inter- 
national life. The national organiza- 
tion is to be made up of regional units 
which shall combine the liberal groups 
in neighboring colleges. This nation- 
al unit plans to be affiliated with sim- 
ilar groups abroad, "with a view to 
an eventual international league of 
college liberals." 

The flexibility of the organization 
permits any college student to become 
a member by paying the yearly dues 
of one dollar When eighty per cent 
of the members of any group, such as 
our Forum, have become members of 
the League, the group automatically 
becomes part of the regional unit, and 
can send delegates to the district and 
national conventions. A central bu- 
reau and an executive committee will 
furnish speakers, literature and other 
forms of assistance to the groups. 
In this way it is hoped that men and 
women of achievement may be in- 
duced to devote a portion of their 
time to lectures in colleges. 

The following new officers are 
working on a campaign for publicity 
and money, so that a formal secretary 
may be appointed in June to under- 
take the plans for next year: 
President — Muriel Morris, Wellesley. 
Vice-presidents — George Arkin, New 
York University of Law. 
Donald Mazer— Columbia Uni- 
versity. 
Secretaries— Mary Switzer, Radcliffe. 
John Rothschild, Harvard Uni- 
versity. 
Some misunderstanding seems to 
have arisen as to the radical tenden- 
cies of the organization. It intends 
to take no stand on the questions dis- 
cussed, and to be subservient to no 
"isms," radical or otherwise. The 
League bases its activities on the en- 
couragement of inquiry and the pre- 
sentation of facts in any field which 
is offering a problem of national or 
wcrld interest. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



WtlktiUp College Jletoa 



ORIENTAL PLAYS TO BE STAGED 
IN BARN 



COLLEGE NOTES 



EDITOR IN CHIEF 

LLIZABETH M. WOODY, 1922 
Associate Editors 

BEATRICE JEFFERSON, 1922 

DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS, 1922 
Assistant Editors 

DOROTHEA COMLY, 1922 

MARGARET WATTERSON, 1922 

ELIZABETH ALLEN, 1923 

MARGARET HOOGS, 1923 

ELIZABETH SANFORD, 1923 

HELEN STAHL, 1923 

DANE VERMILION, 1923 

LOUISE CHILD, 1924 

BARBARA CONGER, 1924 

RUTH HELLER, 1924 

Published weekly during the college year by a board of students of Wellesley College. 
Subscriptions one dollar and seventy-five cents per annum in advance. Smgle copies six 
Jent each. Al. contributions should be in the News office by 9 P. M. on Sunday at the 

latest and should be addressed to Miss E. M. Woody. All Alumnae news should be sent to 
Miss Laura Dwight, Wellesley College, Wellesley. Mass. All bus.ness commumcat.on. and 
subscriptions should be sent to the Wellesley College News, Wellesley Mass_ 

Entered as second-class matter, October 10, 1919, at the Post Off.ce at Wellesley Br.ncK 
Boston, Mass.. under the Act of March 3. 1879. Acceptance for r> hn f •J-^,"* - * 

postage provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized October 80, 1919. 



BUSINESS STAT*" 

Business Manager 

SUSAN GRAFFAM, 1922 

Circulation Manaeer 
BARBARA BATES, 1922 

Assistant Circulation Manager 
LUCY JOHNSON, 1923 

Advertising Manager 

RUTH WHITE, 1923 

Assistant Manag-ers 

MAY FALES, 1924 . 

ANNETTE WRIGHT, 1924 



MAUGUS PRESS, PRINTERS, WELLESLEY, MASS. 



A HINT FROM TREE DAY 



In this year's Tree Day, in which 

the setting is Chinese, the committee 

consulted the foreign students in 

planning costumes and detail. Their 

response shows that in the past the 

college has failed to profit by a gold 

mint of enthusiasm and ability, for 

me thoroughness and application 

b enables a foreign student to ac- 

1 Ush advanced work in an alien 

ige will help solve a knottv 

committee problem. 

Moreover, the foreign student is 
-anxious to learn the secret of leader - 
ship and executive ability, in order 
that her years of preparation in Amer- 
ica may count for the most when she 
returns to her own country. To aid 
and inspire her countrymen she must 
be a leader. 

The college must not think that 
simply because it has never heard for- 
eign students complain of a lack of 
opportunity for executive training 
they are not aware of it. One does 
not speak of such things, particularly 
"when one is a member of a quiet and 
courteous minority. 

If the busy, self-sufficient American 
college girl will consider both aspects 
of the situation, it is safe to say that 
increased cooperation, more efficient 
work, and pleasant companionship 
will result. 



"CONSISTENCY, THOU ART A 
JEWEL" 



At present there exists a manifest 
discrepancy between the different 
academic standards required for soci- 
ety membership and for major college 
offices. 

A prevalent, yet unanswered, ques- 
tion is, 'Why does a girl's academic 
standing allow her to assume the 
enormous responsibilities of a nine 



point office and yet perhaps debar her 
from membership in a society?" 
Another angle of the question is ex- 
pressed by the query, "Do we wish to 
confer the responsibility and honor of 
an important college office on a girl 
whose grades are not high enough 
for society membership?" 

These are situations which have 
often occurred, but still remain de- 
bated by the comparatively small 
group who chance to feel the immedi- 
ate consequences. 

Society membership is regulated ac- 
cording to a fixed academic standard 
which is well known to be above di- 
ploma grade, although the actual 
numerical mark is kept secret. On 
the other hand, only diploma grade is 
necessary for holding any sort of col- 
lege office, whether one point or nine. 
As a result a girl is allowed to hold 
even the presidency of an all-college 
organization or of her class while the 
academic work does not allow her 
membership in a society. 

There are two solutions for this in- 
consistency; one, to lower the aca- 
demic requirement for societies to di- 
ploma grade, and another, to raise 
the standard required for the holding 
of major offices to coincide with that 
of society elgibility. 

The first is not only unsatisfactory 
to many of the faculty but also to 
some of the societies. However, it 
constitutes a fairer plan than now 
exists. The latter plan is more in- 
volved. Since it is obviously not nec- 
essary to raise the academic require- 
ment for all minor office holding, some 
amendment to our present pointing 
system might be made. 

At present, the pointing system is 
arranged according to the amount of 
work in each office. It would be only 
reasonable that the academic basis be 
graded also in such a fashion that the 
present requirement of diploma grade 
continue for offices of one to five 
points but a slightly higher standard 
for those of six to nine points. By 
making this standard equivalent to 
that almost mythological grade which 
constitutes society eligibility, the or- 
iginal objection will be eradicated. 



Wellesley Japanese Girls Rehearsing 
Native Plays to be Given April 23 



A bit of time east is to be brought 
to the stage of the barn, April 23. The 
Japanese girls of Wellesley are re- 
hearsing two of their native plays 
which will give us an enlightened idea 
of etiquette in Japan. 

The first of the two plays has been 
written by the girls themselves, and 
is a dramatization of the Japanese 
fable, "Rip Van Winkle." Given in 
their native language, it will be unin- 
telligible to most of the audience, but 
promises entertainment and an actual 
knowledge of Jananese acting. 

"The Melon Thief," an interlude, 
will be given in English, translated 
literally from the original. In addi- 
tion to the two plays there will be a 
prologue dance, and an overture 
played on the Japanese harp. The 
scenery is to be painted by a Japanese 
artfst, and the costumes are being 
made historically correct. All four 
girls, Kikue Ide, who is chairman of 
the entertainment. Matsuyo Takiza 
wa, Yoshi Kasuya, and Yiki Domoto, 
worked on their costumes during vaca- 
tion to make them according to the 
age and the style of the times they 
represent. 

The fact that only four girls are un- 
dertaking so much shows their desire 
to help Wellesley and to give to girls 
who have never seen Japan some true 
conception of it. The entire proceeds 
of the two performances, afternoon 
and evening of April 23, are to be 
given for the Semi-Centennial Fund. 



UNIQUE AND ORIGINAL 
STUDIO TEA 



Shopping Made Easy for the Benefit 
of the Fund 

The announcements of a Costume 
Studio Tea at the residence of Mrs. 
W. H. Blood, Jr., 147 Grove Street, 
Wellesley, on Monday, April 11, cor. 
veyed only a hint as to the delightful 
originality of the idea. 

In reality the tea was a miniature 
shopping expedition carried on under 
the most favorable conditions. Speak- 
ing of her plans, Mrs. Blood said, "I 
conceived the idea because of the 
great inconvenience of shopping, the 
place being modelled after that of an 
exclusive Fifth Avenue shop. I 
planned a little costume, a gown and 
a hat, and secured the exclusive use 
of some lovely English prints recently 
imported. I found a woman to make 
up the dresses along simple lines and 
secured enough advance orders to 
have living models wearing the cos- 
tumes to act as reception committee 
at the tea." 

The house was decorated in Forsey- 
thia and red maple. Coffee was served 
from 10 to 1 and tea from 2 to 7, 
small tables being placed in the dining 
room for the convenience of the shop- 
pers. 

In the afternoon the college orches- 
tra played and the college girls served 
while in the morning the Pine Manor 
girls had charge. 



$2,700,000 was realized from the 
special Wellesley performance of 
"Abraham Lincoln" for the Fund. 

Dr. Bancroft, the highest bidder 
for the poster at the Faculty Play, 
has presented it to the Library for 
the Historical Collection. 

Isabel Whiting, '18, has completed 
her work for her M. A. in Columbia 
University. Her thesis is on "The 
Political Theories of Oliver Cromwell. 

Helen Parker, '21, has been awarded 
a scholarship for graduate work in 
Chicago Universitv. 

The Whitin Observatory will be 
open to the members of the College. 
Friday evening, April 15, from 7:30 
to 9:30. If the sky be clear the moon 
and planets will be shown. 

An undergraduate committee under 
the direction of Miss Manwaring, has 
been formed to advance the campaign 
for the Endowment Fund in college. 
The members of the committee, of 
which Alice Joy, '21, is chairman, are 
Margaret Byard, '22, Lucille Barrett. 
'22, Margaret Hoogs. '23, and Jean- 
ette Johnson. '24. 

The Ampico Concert given in Bill- 
ings Hall under the auspices of the 
Chickering Piano Company, cleared 
$77.05 for the Fund. 

The juniors of Zeta Alpha gave the 
annual Book Night dinner, Saturday. 
April 9. Seniors and Alumnae were 
guests at a mediaeval dinner, presided 
over by the Lord and Lady of Mis- 
rule. After dinner a shadow drama- 
tization of a Stephen Leacock sketch 
was presented. 

Martha Newbro, Loretta Hassett, 
and Elsie Lustig, '20, were in Welles- 
ley for the week-end. 



MARRIED 



ex '21. Dorothy A. Michel to Mr. 
George E. Smith, on October 23. '20. 



ENGAGED 



Ruth Long to Everett Franh, 
Princeton. '15. 

'22 Elizabeth Milton Thomson to 
Harold Ebert Collins, M. I. T., '18. 



RECENT GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 



The birthday of Alice Freeman 
Palmer, February 21st, was this year 
as usual a red letter day for the Lib- 
rary, as it again received a gift from 
Professor Palmer, who, in spite of the 
storm, came himself to bring forty 
volumes forming the collection of first 
editions of the works of Byron, some 
of them enriched with valuable auto- 
graphs. 

Mr. C. E. Goodspeed also aa'ded to 
the Ruskin collection recently a series 
of portraits of Ruskin representing 
him from early manhood to old age. 
When the Boston Ruskin Club visited 
the Library, March 7th, these made a 
very appropriate decoration for the 
Treasure Room and were much en- 
joyed by the Club, who were enthusi- 
astic over the whole Ruskin collection 
presented by Mr. Goodspeed last June. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 




SHERWOOD EDDY DISCUSSES 
WORLD CHAOS 



o Was Moseley? 



E was a young Oxford man, only twenty-seven when 
he was killed at Gallipoli. Up to his time, man had 
never seen the inside of an atom. He turned the 
X-rays on matter — not figuratively but literally — and made 
them disclose the skeleton of an atom just as certainly as a 
surgeon makes them reveal the positions of the bones of the 
bocfy. Moseley proved that all atoms are built up of the 
sams kind of matter. He saw, too, just why an atom of 
copper is different from an atom of gold. 

Atoms are built up of electrons. Each atom consists of 
a nucleus, a kind of sun, with a certain number of electrons 
grouped about it, like planets. Moseley actually counted 
the number of electrons of all the metals from aluminum 
to gold. 

When you discover what gold is made of or a new fact 
about electricity, you open up new possibilities for the use 
of gold or electricity. For that reason the Research Labora- 
tories of the General Electric Company are as much con- 
cerned with the "how" of things — atoms and electrons, for 
instance — as they are with mere applications of the electric 
current. 

Hence Moseley's work has been continued in the Re- 
search Laboratories, with the result that more has been 
learned about matter. How does water freeze? What is 
lead? Why are lead, iron, gold and tungsten malleable? 
Such questions can be answered more definitely now than 
ten years ago. And because they can be answered it is 
possible to make more rapid progress in illumination, in 
X-ray photography, in wireless telegraphy, and in elec- 
trical engineering as a whole. 

There would have been no coal-tar industry without the 
vast amount of research conducted in organic chemistry, 
and no electro-chemical industry without such work as Sir 
Humphrey Davey's purely scientific study of an electric 
current's effect on caustic potash and caustic soda. Sooner 
or later research in pure science always enriches the world 
with discoveries that can be practically applied. For these 
reasons the Research Laboratories of the General Electric 
Company devote so much time to the study of purely 
scientific problems. 




General Office 



Schenectady, N. Y. 



(Continued from page 1, col. 3) 

stipulation as to subject or form. 

3. Each poem must be signed by a 
nom de plume. A sealed envelope 
must accompany the manuscript, con- 
taining both the real name and the 
nom de plume of the writer. 

4. Some well known poet will act 
as judge and the prize will be award- 
ed at Commencement. 

Committee: 

Laura E. Lockwood 
Martha P. Conant 
Annie K. Tuel] 



WOULD YOU IF YOU COULD? 



Be smartly gowned ? You may have 
everything your heart desires for a 
moderate damage. No war tax. 

I design, create and put together at 
long distance ANYTHING you crave 
in the clothes line. Dresses, for in- 
stance, range from $5 for the plain 
unfurbelowed gingham breed, to $10 
fcr the tucked, hand-wruoght and riv 
eted organdie and georgette, etc., vari- 
ety. 



95-3C2-D 



Those who lived in those halcyon 
days when 1919 flourished can testify 
that I am an "honest, painstaking 
modiste, never known to scorch or 
steal your goods." 

Order your Commencement outfits 
at once. It will count on Father's In- 
come Tax return next year as a de- 
duction, i. e., "Contribution to Welles- 
ley College Drive." 

Margaret P. Littlehales, 

2132 LeRoy Place, 
Washington, D. C. 



U. S. Held to be in More Serious 
Condition than England 



Mir. Sherwood Eddy spoke on the 
challenge of the present world situa- 
tion in the Chapel on Thursday eve- 
ning, April 7. Mr. Eddy has just rt 
turned from a study of the conditions 
of the Asiatic and European nations. 

The disorder in the world today is, 
like that which has followed every 
great war. Mankind is on the march: 
it is passing from autocracy to dem- 
ocracy. Great changes are taking 
place. The question is whether these 
changes will come by revolution or 
by evolution. In England, in spite of 
strikes and differences, capital and 
labor are coming together on common 
grounds of humanity and Mr. Eddy 
feels sure they are going to avoid rev- 
olution. 

To Mr. Eddy the situation is Amer- 
ica is more serious than that of any 
other nation. The difficulty in this 
country is that the control of the 
wealth is in the hands of the few. 
The sugar, oil, automobile, meat-pack- 
ing, tobacco and other great indus- 
tries are controlled by a small num- 
ber, and, as ownership of land, there 
are large privately-owned estates in 
the west that are ten times the size 
of the largest estate in Britain. 

On the other hand, there are in the 
United States now four million unem- 
ployed men. In normal times, there 
are always ten million people in pov- 
erty. These constitute the social and 
industrial problem of the nation. Mr. 
Eddy says we are drifting blindly and 
unpreparedly into a great crisis. A 
solution must be found. Socialism 
will not do it; no paper system will 
do it; there must be a new spirit, a 
new attitude. 

In the great social principles of 
Jesus, the solution is to be found. 
These principles are personality or 
the infinite worth of man, brother- 
hood, service, liberty, justice, account- 
ability, and the golden rule — to do as 
we would be done by. All are summed 
up in one word — love. Instead of 
this, the prevailing theory of life 
seems to embody possessions, strife, 
personal profit, injustice, selfishness 
and the rule of gold — all summed up 
in hate. 

These two theories represent ideal- 
ism versus materialism, the Christian 
versus the pagan. As great examples 
of the success of experiments where 
these principles have been applied to 
industry, Mr. Eddy spoke of the co- 
operative movement in Great Britain, 
whose membership has grown from 
twenty-eight members to fifteen mill- 
ion; he also spoke of a factory in Cm 
cinnati where fairmindedness and the 
cooperation of employer and em- 
ployees have resulted not only in their 
mutual benefit but in benefit to the 
whole industry. 

All these problems need for their 
solution the minds of thinking men 
and women. Here, said Mr. Eddy, 
opportunity waits the students of 
America. 



4 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 




dbercrombie & Fitch Co 



EZRA H. FITCH, President 
Madison Avenue and 45th St., 



New York. 



WILL DISPLAY 

COLLEGE GIRLS' CLOTHING FOR EVERYDAY AND OUTING WEAR 

INCLUDING 

SUITS, COATS, HATS, BOOTS AND SHOES AND ALL OTHER ARTICLES OF OUTDOOR WEARING APPAREL AT THE 

COLLEGE INN, THURSDAY, AND FRIDAY, APRIL 14 AND 15. 

Miss Helen Boyd in charge. 



mmnae Body Contributes Over 
Million to Fund 



(Continued from page 1, col. 1) 



6. Plainly marked as specimens for 
Wellesley Semi-Centennial Fund. 

7. Sent to Emily Sophie Brown, 104 
Hillside Ave., Naugatuck, Conn. 

Louise Bascom Barratt, '07, who 
has a five part dime novel mystery 
serial commending in the May number 
of Today's Housewife, offers a prize 
of $10 for the best answer to the 
question, "What would you have done 
with Mrs. Emerson? Omitted her? 
Improved upon her?" If so, how? 
Letters should be addressed to Louise 
Rand Bascom, c |-oTODAY'S HOUSE- 
WIFE, Cooperstown, N. Y. 

Loma McLean Milne of 6 Glen 

Road, Lexington, Mass., has made 

$37.50 in one month by sending out 

aprons containing a pocket to 

k is pinned the following verse: 

his little blue apron is sent to you 
this is what we wish you would 

do 
The little pocket you plainly see 
For a special purpose is meant to be — 
Now measure your waist line, inch by 

inch, 
And see that the measure does not 

pinch 

YOU HAVE WRITTEN POEMS! 

Do you care to have them revised or 
■constructively criticised by successful 
authors ? If you do, then send us your 
manuscript (stories, articles or po- 
ems). We will criticise, and place 
them should they prove to be accept- 
able for publication. 

There is no actual charge for our 
services. If, however, you have not 
previously enrolled with the advisory 
department of this association, we re- 
quest that you enclose the initial fee 
•of two dollars, which we must ask of 
each new contributor There is no 
additional expense, no future obliga- 
tion. 

It must be realized that we can only 
be of aid to those of serious intent. If 
you do mean to strive for literary suc- 
cess, we can help you in many ways. 
Our services are yours until we have 
actually succeeded in marketing at 
least one of your manuscripts. Send 
something today! 

Please enclose return postage with 
your communications. 

NATIONAL LITERARY 

ASSOCIATION 

131 W. 39th St. 

New York City 

Advisory Department 



For each small inch you measure 

around 
In the pocket put a penny sound — 
The game is fail you will admit 
You "waist" your money; we pocket 

it." 
Then send it, please, without delay 
For the Wellesley Fund on Com- 
mencement Day. 

Mrs. W. H. Riker, 404 Home Ave., 
Oak Park, 111., will send, postage 
paid, upon receipt of one dollar, a 
Wellesley blue boutoniere which has 
been made with extreme care by Wel- 
lesley girls. Those who wish to re- 
sell this really charming little article 
may order at the special rate of $7.75 
per dozen. 

Mrs. Joseph H. Gaskell, 200 East 
Main St., Morristown, N. J., will send 
200 sheets of paper and 100 envelopes 
printed with any name and address 
upon receipt of $1.50. 

The Wellesley blue gardens have 
been selling like hotcakes. The Cleve- 
land Wellesley Club, which originally 
ordered 500 packets, has wired for 
150 more. The interest in the gardens 
has led the Wing Seed Company of 
Mechanicsburg, Ohio, to offer Welles- 
ley Women a chance to sell some won- 
derful varieties of iris on a fifty-fifty 
basis where orders are for $50 or 
more. A circular letter will be sent 
to those interested. Mrs. Willis Wing, 
(Eva M. Gay, '97), is to select a new 
iris seedling which will be named 
Wellesley and it is hoped that every- 
one will begin planting iris after 
August. As a token of his apprecia- 
tion, Mr. Wing is presenting to the 
college ten choice iris which is an ex- 
ceedingly attractive gift when one re- 
flects that the rare bulbs sell for $100 
each. 



WELLESLEY DELEGATES TO 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
WELL SATISFIED WITH A. A. 



Maude Ludington '21 and Mildred 

Durant '22 Return from Indiana 

With Interesting Story 



"It is a big step forward for Wel- 
lesley's A. A. to be recognized among 
those of the large colleges and un. 
versifies at a national athletic confer- 
ence," said Maude Ludington, 21, 
President of Wellesley's Athletic As- 
sociation, in speaking of the recent 
conference at the University of Indi- 
ana to which she was official delegate. 
The conference, under the auspices of 
the Athletic Confederation of Ameri- 
can College Women, was the second 
(Continued on page 6, col. 1) 



FELLOWSHIP OFFERED IN 
ENGLISH LITERATURE 



FARNSWORTH ART MUSEUM 



Applications for the Ruth Ingersoll 
Goldmark fellowship of $250, for 
graduate work in English Literature, 
or in the Classics, should be sent be- 
fore May 1st to Miss Margaret Sher- 
wood. 



The competing designs made by 
Wellesley art students for the official 
poster of the Semi-Centennial Fund 
and the printed poster are on exhibi- 
tion at the Farnsworth Museum. The 
exhibition will continue through Sat- 
urday, April 16th. 




D 



BONWIT TELLER 6.CQ 7, 



UJie(5peccalfa(5Jiop<}fOriaina£an4 
FIFTH AVENUE AT 38™STREET,NEWYORK 



ANNOUNCE AN 
Exnihit ana Sale of 

MISSES' &> WOMEN'S 
SPRING FASHIONS 

at the 

vvellesley Inn 

APRIL 18, 19, 20 

The complete wardrobe for the 
Miss at college — from boots to 
millinery — the accessories and 
tne dainty unaerthings in types 
that accentuate youth, simplicity 
and elega 





jance 



. <& - lflO 




-li-T-a-Cs'" 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



Thresher Bros. 

"The Specialty Silk Store" 

15, 17, 19 TEMPLE PLACE 

Through to 41 West Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 

SILKS! SILKS! SILKS 

For Street Wear For Spoit Wear 

For Evening Wear For Underwear 

For Everywear 

Also 

Chiffon Velvets, Velveteens, Corduroys 

and Plushes 

Woolen Dress Goods 

Silk and Lingerie Blouses 

Silk Petticoats 

Thresher Bros. 

"The Specialty Silk Store" 
15, 17, 19, TEMPLE PLACE 

BOSTON, MASS. 
Through to 41 West Street 

DR. STANLEY E. HALL 

DENTIST 

The Waban Wellesley, Mass. 

Telephone 566-W 



A. GAN 



FASHIONABLE 
LADIES' TAILOR 



Cleansing, Pressing and Mending. 
All kinds of furs relined and re- 
modeled. 



TAXI SERVICE 

Baggage Transfer 

Perkins Garage 

SUMNER FROST, Proprietor 



69 Central St, Wellesley, Man. 

Telephone 
Wellesley 409 

CA.RS STORED. Let us store 

your car for you in our new 

modern Garage. Cars washed 
and polished. 




OfC 



ourse 



THE* PARLIAMENT* OF* FOOLS 



PROFESSOR GEO. W. SNOOK'S 

LECTURE ON "GORTON'S 

CODFISHNOBONES" 



(A Write-up Dreamed by Our Special 
Correspondent at a Lecture) 



Under the auspices of the depart- 
ment of Boneology, a stupefying lec- 
ture was mumbled to an audience re- 
quired by several departments to be 
present, on Friday, the thirteenth, P. 
M., right after dinner,, a few minutes 
before the faculty arrived at Billings. 

Professor Snooks, observed the girl 
behind us, has brown whiskers and is 
from Harvard University. (Adv.) He 
has thoroughly digested his subject 
and easily carried away the interest 
of his audience. 

The main point of the lecture 
seemed well-expressed by the student 
on our left, who whispered over and 
over to herself "In Case of Fire Walk 
Do Not Run to the Nearest Exit." 

In support of this point, many in- 
stances were cited, and the speaker 
even took the trouble to show slides, 
upside down. These, he explained, 
were more difficult of execution than 
slides right side up. 

After the thunders of applause at 
this maneuver had passed away, the 
lecturer further stated that it remind- 
ed him of an incident of his childhood, 
wherein his Sunday school teache* 
asked the class of little boys. (See 
The American Boy, April 1898.) 

So great was the laughter that 
greeted this anecdote, that janitors 
with sprinkling cans were rushed to 
the scene to quell the hysteria. Sel- 
dom has a lecturer at Wellesley found 
his audience so demonstrative. At 
the close of Professor Snooks' re- 

Dr. Chas. A. DRAPER 

FOOT SPECIALIST 

ORTHOPEDIC CHIROPODIST 

ALL FOOT AILMENTS 
SCIENTIFICALLY TREATED 

Suite 414, Huntington Chambers 
Copley Sq., Boston 

Near Back Bay Station 
Phone B. B. 839. 



We Have Photographs of 

MISS PENDLETON MISS BATES 

MISS SHERWOOD PROF. HAMILTON 

MISS SHACKFORD PROF. MACDOUGAL 



FACULTY PLAY COLLEGE BUILDINGS 

20% of all proceeds will be given to Fund 

SUE RICE STUDIO 

10 Grove St. 



marks, a final tribute was accorded 
him by those present, who rose to 
their feet as one man and made for 
the doors. 



PROFESSOR WRECKS BEECH 
UPHOLDS TREE DAY 



"What," interrogated the reporter 
expectantly, simultaneously opening 
her arctics and note-book, "is your 
opinion of Tree Day?" The w. k. 
tree authority replied as follows: 

"Tree Day, my girl, has never at- 
tained to those ideals for which those 
who know and love trees have been 
ever striving. I pass over those Tree 
Days of bygone years which it has 
been my privilege to consider failures. 
Should the Wellesley authorities rel- 
egate to me the directing of Tree Day 
festivities this Spring, I should indub- 
itably make of them an unforseen suc- 
cess." 

"What," queried the reporter, strok- 
ing the panting Adonais to quiet his 
yelps, "would be your method of pro- 
cedure?" 

"First," reiterated Mr. Beech, point- 
ing to the quivering hound, "I should 
allow no barking at Tree Day, and 
Freshmen, evergreen, should be 
chained to Elms, Birches, or Maples. 
Now as for Tree Day itself. All the 
students' trunks should be brought 
from the dormitories by Mr. Oakes 
and his staff and placed in a semi- 
serious array on Tower Court Hill. 
To this should be added elephant 
trunks from the Zoo. Lab. Students 
representing branches of learning, 
their limbs arrayed in leaves of ab- 
sence — " 

But Adonais at' this juncture fled 
precipitantly, and the reporter, se- 
curely tied to the other end of the 
leash, dogged his footsteps. 



SILVER BAY 



The Intercollegiate Conferences at 
Silver Bay and Maqua bid fair to be 
even better this year than usual. 
Courses are planned dealing with the 
problems of the college woman, the 
position of the church in the world to- 
day, fundamentals of Daily Living, 
lectures in World Fellowship and 
Christian fundamentals. There will 
also be the usual .student mass meet- 
ing-, and discussion groups. Before 
leaving Wellesley every girl should 
go to either Silver Bay or Maqua. 
College girls tend to become local 
and self-centered, and these confer- 
ences offer the opportunity of meeting 
other colleges and learning their prob- 
lems. For those who are interested. 
further information will te postei on 
the C. A. bulletin board. If there are 
any questions, see Elizabeth Rand. 
319 Cazenove. 



WE 
HAVE 
THE 
BEST 



The 

Wellesley 
Fruit 
Co. 



Free Delivery 



Tel. 138-W 



NEW PICTURES NEW FRAMES 

— GEAGHAN 

WELLESLEY STUDIO 

and 

FRAME SHOP 

Wellesley Sq. 
Amateur finishing in 24 hours 



Wonderful 
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FOR 



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Tan Russia Calf 
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In our new second floor department 
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E. W. Burt & Co. 

32 Wast Street 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



WELLESLEY DELEGATES TC 
NATIONAL CONFERENCE 

(Continued from page 4, col. 2) 



A. A. SPELLING MATCH WON 
BY FRESHMEN 



held and the first attended by Wellesley 
delegates. "The best part of the con- 
ference," continued Maud Ludington, 
"was the opportunity to 'give and 
take' good ideas. Membership in the 
A. C. A. C. W. does not require col- 
leges to adopt any of the plans sug- 
gested at the conference, but if we 
find that a college in Minnesota has a 
better system of awarding points, we 
naturally feel that it would improve 
our A. A. to adopt it." 

The purpose of the organization ir, 
to standardize American women's ath 
letics and to form a central basis upon 
which to work in deciding intercolle- 
giate matters. The prestige of such 
an organization, moreover, as repre- 
senting the athletic majority of Amer- 
ican university opinion is necessarily 
great, and its decisions, though not 
compulsory in their operation, carry 
with them corresponding weight. 

Standardization of the point sys- 
tem, transferring of points from one 
college to another and arrangements 
for coming conferences were some of 
the many matters discussed at the 
conference. A debate on the question 
of using Spalding's official basket-ball 
rules, a swimming meet won, with the 
help of Mildred Durant, '22, unofficial 
delegate, by the Eastern colleges, a 
tea, a reception, a dance drama given 
by Indiana, and a final banquet filled 
up whatever time was not consumed 
in conference. 

The two delegates, both of whom 
were entertained at the private home 
of Professor and Mrs. Frank Wood- 
burn of the University of Indiana, re- 
turned testifying to a delightful two 
days and a glorified idea of Welles- 
ley's A. A. "Neither of us had any 
idea," said Mildred Durant, "how fa- 
vorably our athletic association would 
compare with those of big western 
colleges. After I had spoken a few 
minutes at one of the meetinge about 
our A. A. I was besieged with people 
who wanted to know more about it." 



Proceeds Go to '24 for the Fund 



The eighth grade atmosphere was 
effectively created Saturday evening 
at an old-fashioned spelling-bee given 
in the Barn by A. A., to help the 
Fund both financially and by public- 
ity. 

Marcia Cressey, '21, as "Teacher" 
introduced the visiting trustees, who 
occupied the platform in awful dig- 
nity and beamed condescendingly upon 
each earnest pupil. "Teacher" then 
announced that to the child who stood 
up longest would go the proceeds of 
the whole affair, for her class. 

Ten representatives were chosen 
from each class, '21, and '23 against 
'22 and '24. Some confusion was 
caused by certain unruly small boys, 
in the persons of Barbara Bean, '21, 
Leslye Thomas, '21, and Carr Igle- 
hart, '22_. whose whispering and fist 
fights required several reprimands 
from teacher. 

The class bore up nobly through 
the comparatively simple words in 
the speller, but when "Teacher" fell 
back on the dictionary, many fell by 
the wayside. The slaughter occa- 
sioned by "picromel" was appalling. 
The suspense was tremendous as only 
two on each side were left, and the 
audience of the fallen felt obliged to 
relieve its feelings by singing the 
classic "School Days." 

Three of the remaining four went 
down on "onomatopoeia" and Beatrice 
Wyer, '24, triumphantly gave the 
correct version and received congrat- 
ulations with becoming modesty. 

Some of the children then spoke 
pieces, and Carr Iglehart and Barbara 
Bean as brother and sister gave a 
duet about Samuel and his solitary 
"camuel" which was immensely pop- 
ular, particularly after the entrance 
of the "camuel." Leslye Thomas 
caused "Teacher" a good deal of un- 
easiness by being at once drunk and 
feeble-minded for her classmates' en- 




tertainment. Aimee L. Bettman re- 
cited a sad little poem about a beau 
of hers and then "Teacher" obliged by 
giving "Hamlet" and "The Minister," 
which were received with enthusiasm. 
The party broke up with the Vir- 
ginia Reel, followed by the customary 
jazz, as furnished by a five-piece or- 
chestra. It is estimated that about 
thirty dollars were cleared from the 
admission fees of fifteen cents and the 
sale of lollypops and this amount 
will go to 1924's credit to help along 
the Fund. 



APPOINTMENT BUREAU OFFERS 
POSITIONS FOR SENIORS 



Details regarding positions men- 
tioned in this column will be fur- 
nished by the Secretary of the Ap- 
pointment Bureau in response to in- 
quiry by letter or in office hours, No. 
1, Administration Building. The pre- 
fixed number should be mentioned. 

123. The Secretary of the Appoint- 
ment Bureau has been asked to sug- 
gest candidates for appointment un- 
der a school system in a city of Colo- 



rado. The salaries are good and the 
location one of much beauty and fine 
opportunities. 

124. Someone able to teach English 
and either French or German is need- 
ed for a school in one of the chief cit- 
ies of China, preparatory to a med- 
ical school in the same city,, under 
the management of American trus- 
tees. The position is thus not strict- 
ly in missionary work. The period of 
service is two years and the salary is 
to be about $3000 with some further 
allowance for rent and probably for 
travel. 

125. An executive agent for a 
county child welfare board is needed 
in a middle-west state. The quest 
is for someone who has had such 
training in child and educational psy- 
chology as to be able to give mental 
tests as well as to meet the other 
duties of the position. 

126. A position with opportunities 
for training is offered in a charitable 
organization in southern New Eng- 
land. The salary would be fair and 
the opportunity of advancement well 
worth while. 



S. Altmmt $c (£n 



NEW YORK 



will hold an interesting 



FASHION 



EXHIBIT 



at the Wellesley Inn 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 

On Friday and Saturday 

April 22nd and 23d 

Misses and Young Women's 

Frocks, Suits, Coats, Hats, Blouses and all the essentials 
of dress, for the Spring and Summer seasons, are includ- 
ed in the assortments. 

INSPECTION IS CORDIALLY INVITED 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 





GIRDLE 



PATENTED 



She All- Elastic Corset 

—is the Ideal Corset for College Girls 

7 HE TREO GIRDLE is made entirely of porous 
woven surgical elastic web, which "gives" freely 
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holds the figure. Lends grace with absolute 
comfort. Our patented method o± construction 
and character of materials used make it equally 
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wear; white or flesh tint. Price $2.00 to $ 15.00. 

CAUTION — The TREO GIRDLE has feature strip of elastic above 
elastic waist-line band, and, therefore, supports the body above 
and below waist-line. If not at your dealer s, write for Free Booklet. 




COMPANY, Inc. 

160-X FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 



LIBRARY EXHIBITS LUTHER 
AND DANTE RELICS 



This year the Protestant world will 
celebrate the four hundredth anniver- 
sary of Luther's historic stand before 
the Diet of Worms. April 18th, 1521.. 
was the date when the young monk 
faced the Diet or Congress of the Em- 
pire consisting of the Emperor, 
princes of the realm and representa- 
tives of the Free Cities, and refused 
to recant. 

The College Library possesses a 
rather remarkable collection of materi- 
al connected with the Reformation in 
Germany, including very rare editions 
cf works of Luther, Melancthon and 
other reformers as well as books 
bearing autographs of Melancthon 

Your health as well as your 
good appearance Require a well 
fitted Corset and Brassiere. 

Let 

Madame Whitney 

The Waban, up one flght, Wel- 
lesley Square. 

assist you in making the Proper 
Selection and in Procuring the 
correct fitting. 

Treo Girdles, Sport and Danc- 
ing Corsets. Fine Hosiery and 

Lingerie. 



and other contemporaries of Luther, 
including Hubert Languet, the human- 
ist and friend of Sir Philip Sidney. 
The Bible which once belonged to 
Melancthon is, of course, one of the 
greatest treasures. These books will 
be on exhibition in the cases outside 
the Treasure Room, beginning April 
16th. 

This year also, both Catholics and 
Protestants celebrate the six hun- 
dredth anniversary of the death of 
Dante, the great Italian poet, who, 
though remaining a devoted church- 
man yet protested against the cor- 
ruption cf the papacy of his time. An 
exhibition of manuscripts and early 
traditions of the works of Dante and 
his contemporaries will be found in 
the cases near the Plimpton and His- 
tory Rooms. 



"Great oaks from little acorns grow" The dollars from these soap cakes flow 

for 

THE WELLESLEY SEMI- CENTENNIAL FUND 

ACORN SOAP 
..lave you a cake of Acorn soap in your room? 
It not only floats but it iasts. Wonderful for your complexion. 

Watch it lather in hard water. Don't go to the village for your soap. 

3ome to the Alumnae Office and get 



ACORN SOAP 



2 cakes 25c. 



9 cakes $1.00. 



SUMMER CAMP LEADERS 



The Demonstration Center for Out- 
of-Doors life, situated on Greenwood 
Lake, N. Y., plans to give a five 
weeks' course in camp leadership this 
summer, and hopes to have applies 
tiens from the eastern colleges. 

Those interested in the out-of-doors 
movement may find information upon 
the subject in a circular on the Voca- 
tional Guidance board in Founders 
Hall, and will also have a chance to 
hear Miss Grace Parker, president of 
the Demonstration Center, who will 
speak on "The Making of Americans 
Through Out-of-Doors Life," at 4:40 
P. M., Friday. April 15, in 24 Found- 
ers Hall 



HATS 



Our new Spring hats, in all the 
straws and silks in fashion this sea- 
son, are ready for you, in your choice 
of style and color, at low cost. 

Come in the next time you are in 

town. 



BOSTON 

Sixty-five — Sixty-nine Summer Street 



8 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



CALENDAR 



April 14 — Academic Council, 4 P. 
M. 124 Founders Hall. 7:30 P. M. 
Billings, Address by Monsieur Henre 
Guy, Dean of the University of 
Toulouse, Exchange Professor of Lit- 
erature at Harvard University. Sub- 
ject: Two famous Schools for French 
Girls, Saint Cyr and Ecouen. 8 P. 
M., Chapel, Organ Recital by Dr. 
Davison of Harvard. 

April 15, 4:40 P. M. 24 Founders— 
Ilustrated Lecture by Miss Grace 
Parker, leader of class for camp coun- 
cillors. Subject: Outdoor Life. 7:30 
P. M., Billings Hall. Address by Miss 
Gilson. 7:30 to 9:30, Whitin Observa- 
tory open to members of the college. 

April 16, P. M. Gymnasium — Indoor 
Baseball game. 7:30 P. M., Barn. 
Spanish Play, "El Principe que todo 
lo Aprendio en Los Libros," by Jacin- 
te Benavente. Tickets at 25c on sale 
at "El Table" Thursday and Friday. 

April 17, 11 A. M., Chapel— Preach- 
er, Reverend Charles E. Park of Bos- 
ton. 7:30 P. M., Vesper service. Ad- 
dress by Mr. John F. Moors of Bos- 
ton. Subject, The Ideals of America. 
April 19, 4:40 P. M., Billings— Stu- 
dent Recital. 

April 20, 7:15 P. M., Billings— C. 
A. Meeting. • Speaker, Professor 
Marshall L. Perrin of Boston Unver- 
sity. Subject. An American Professor 
as a Teacher in a Chinese University. 



Alumnae ©ept. 

Uumnae and former students are oread t» 
operate in making this department Bstatv 
ting, by sending all notices promptly to 
imnae Office, Wellesley (College) Mass. 



BORN 



'02 To Anna (Henning) Luther, a 
son, John, March 9. 

'10 To Alice (Atwood) Fisher, a 
son, Kendall Withington, March 7. 

'14 To Eleanor (Fowle) Clark, a 
second son, Wilson Farnsworth, Feb- 
ruary 25, at Schenectady, N. Y. 

'14 To Lillian (Lacy) Beale, a 
daughter, Laura Lacy, March 22. 

SHORTHAND 

SYSTEM 
IN TEN 
EASY LESSONS 

This course covers ten easy lessons which will 
enable the Student. Professor. Journalist, Doc- 
tor, Lawyer or anyone seeking a professional 
career, to go thru life with 100 per cent effi- 
cient. 

THIS COURSE 

Is short and inexpensive, and is given with 
a mondy back guarantee if not satisfied. 

SEND THIS CLIPPING TODAY 

PYRAMID PRESS : PUBLISHERS 
1416 Broadway, 
New York City 

Gentlemen : — Enclosed herewith is $5.00 for 
which kindly send me your shorthand course 
in ten ea?y lessons by mail. It is understood 
that at the end of five days, I am not satis- 
fied my money will be gladly refunded. 



Name 

Street 

City and State 

COLLEGE NOTE 



Mrs. Beale was a sister of Laura Lacy 
who died in 1916 and for whom this 
daughter is named. 

'16 To Angeline (Loveland) Faran, 
a son, James, April 1, at Youngstown, 
Ohio. 

'17 To Emma (Barrett) Coffin, a 
second daughter, Jean Barrett, March 
24, at Ithaca, N. Y. 

'19 To Dorothy (Risk) Barnes, a 
son, John Winthrop, March G, at Fort 
Bliss, Texas. 



DIED 

'92 Francis Underwood Perry, son 
of Grace (Underwood) Perry, March 
21, in Florence, Italy. 

'02 John Luther, infant son of Anna 
(Henning) Luther, March 11, in Potts- 
ville, Pa. 

'10 Thomas Stretton, father of Mar- 
ion (Stretton) Esten, March 19, in 
Cambridge, Mass. 

'15 Dorothy Cooper Willhite, nine 
months old daughter, of Mabel (Coop- 
er) Willhite, March 16, while visiting 
in Tampa, Florida. 



MARRIED 



'20 Margaret Owen to Weir Orford 
Merryweather of Montclair, N. J., 
September 16, in Denver, Colorado. 
Address, 477 East 7th Ave., Denver, 
Colorado. 



ENGAGED 



'13 Edith ■ Stratton to Joseph E. 
Piatt, Pennsylvania State College, '10; 
of M'enkden, Manchuria, China, Y. M. 
C. A. Secretary for seven years. 

'18 Lillian Barr to Gerard L. Hins- 
kamp, University of Pennsylvania '19. 

'19 Florence I. Langley to James F. 
Harris of Boston. 

'19 Julia V. Brannock to John Owen 
Rees, Oberlin '14, of Cleveland, Ohio. 

'20 Leona C. Kurth to James Louis 
Moors of New York City, Harvard 
Law School Graduate. 




April is the Month of Showers 
Have you a Smart 

UMBRELLA 

to protect your new spring suit? 

Our New Assortment includes 

Colored Silk Umbrellas — some with pearl bakalite 
handles, leather trimmings and stub ends; others with 
ring or cord loop handles. $8.00 to $15.00 

Black Silk Umbrellas — with fancy handles $10.00 
Changeable Silk Umbrellas plain silks with fancy 
borders. $12.00 

Jordan Marsh Company 




FRANK BROTHERS 

Fifth Avenue Boot Shop 

Near Forty-Eighth Street, New York 

Boots, Slippers, Hosiery for Men, 

Women and Children 

BOSTON 



CHICAGO 
Michigan Blvd. Bids. 
corner Washington St. 

ST. LOUIS 
Arcade Building 



NEW HAVEN 

Hotel Tat t 

PITTSBURGH 

Jenkins Arcade 

CLEVELAND 

Athletic Club Building 



Tremont and Boyiston St*. 
Little Building 

WASHINGTON 

Woodward Building 

opp. Shoreham Hotel 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Whitney Building 

183 Geary Street 



See The 

Wellesley Sport Hats 

At The 

Rainbow Art Shop 

Opposite Wellesley Inn 

$7.50 each 

No Two Alike 



Blouses, 

Suits, Gowns, 

Skirts, Coats, 

Sweaters, 
Silk Petticoats 

and Furs. 

Meyer Jonasson & Co. 

BOSTON 
'TTremoiOLt; janxl Bo^rlston Sts. 




Cape Cod Camp 

to fix up a little, plenty lumber, also 
garage. Adjoins artist's $50,000 es- 
tate. Beautiful cedars, pines, roses, 
bayberries, mayflowers, beach plums, 
blackberries, blueberries, cranberries, 
apples and pears. Seven Minutes to 
Quanset Girls' camp and elegant ocean 
bathing beach, boating, tennis and 
golf. Lots of clams, scollops, fish and 
oysters free. Exclusive neighborhood, 
called Millionaires' Paradise. Five 
acres of land. Price $2500. Terms 
can be arranged. Other places $4000 
to $25,000. Ca.pe Cod is the healthiest 
place in the United States. For par- 
ticulars write: — 

Ivan L. Martin, Yarmouth, Mass.., 



You are cordially invited to visit 

The Yarn Shop 

at its new quarters to look over 
our new line of 

Good Shepherd Yarns 

We have all the wanted colors 
in Iceland Wool and Silverfloss- 
Free directions furnished in con- 
venient leaflet form. We solicit 
your patronage.